Through an analogic 35mm film, the Cambridge-based photographer Maya Beano portrays nature’s ever-changing moods and the relationship they have with her personal thoughts and feelings. She was born in Jordan, whose landscapes are featured in several of her photography series and her identity is shaped by all the cultures she is a part of. To her, to be able to express herself in a visual form, it is something very empowering.

I grew up taking pictures on film, moved on to a digital camera in my late teens and moved back to film in my twenties. Personally, I enjoy the tangibility of film.

What is your first photographic memory?
The first camera in my life was a Kodak from Disneyland which my mother gave me. I used to run around the house with it taking photos of my younger brothers. I recently found one of the earliest photos I took: my baby brother on his toy horse in 1995.

Could you describe yourself with a book, a song and movie?
I don’t know if these describe me, but they’re certainly some of my all-time favourites.
Book: “Staying Alive” by Neil Astley
Song: “Stardust” by Nat King Cole
Movie: “Fly Away Home” (the geese!)

Which of your pictures would you choose to introduce yourself?
I was flying back to England from Amman on New Year’s Eve a few years ago, and I took a photo on the plane of the shadow of my hand. This was the last exposure of the last roll of film I had during that trip. I think this is still one of my most recognised photos, and I’m glad it resonates with a lot of people.

A famous picture, not yours, you would have liked to take.
One of the famous black and white photos of Amelia Earhart sitting in her plane. I don’t know who took it, and I know it’s a completely different style of photography, but I really love the sense of determination in her eyes.

A famous person you would like to portray.
Queen Rania of Jordan perhaps! She does a lot to improve education and empower young people.

You say you prefer film photography to digital photography, and 35mm film more than any other. We think it is inspiring to see young photographer using film nowadays. Speaking about you, why do you prefer film to digital?
I grew up taking pictures on film, moved on to a digital camera in my late teens and moved back to film in my twenties. I don’t think there’s any rule to this, and I have seen brilliant pieces of work by both film and digital photographers. Personally, I enjoy the tangibility of film.

We know you were born in Amman, Jordan. Do you think your original background is still present in your art? If so, how?
Of course! I am a blend of all of my backgrounds, and my identity is shaped by all the cultures I am a part of.
I regularly go back to visit Jordan, and its landscapes are featured in several of my photography series. Even when I’m not there, I find myself thinking about my childhood and all of the experiences that have led me to become the person I am today.

You capture chances that many of us miss or do not see. How do you choose the subjects of your art? Which relationship do you have with the places and people you portray?
All of the people in my photos are my close friends, and most of my photos are taken during our trips away together. We’ve been to different parts of the world, including all the way to the Arctic. My family members also make an appearance from time to time. I feel very lucky to have such a supportive and adventurous group of people in my life. I just love them so much. I’m slightly obsessed with cold places, which sometimes proves to be problematic because some of my friends are, understandably, more fond of the warmth. We alternate between cold and warm countries! I’m taking one of my best friends to Jordan soon because she has promised to come to Iceland or the Alps with me after that.

In your photos you report the interplay between nature and human emotion. Precisely, you portray nature’s ever-changing moods and the relationship they have with your personal thoughts and feelings. How much does nature interact with your feelings?
I remember a time in my late teens when my mood depended completely on the weather. When it was cloudy and foggy, I’d feel very low and I’d only feel better when the sky got brighter again. This stage passed, and my mood isn’t linked to the clouds anymore, but I still remember the intensity of it. It was a difficult time in my life in general, and I now look back and think I must have been struggling with seasonal affective disorder. I really love stormy weather now! More tea for me.

I’m slightly obsessed with cold places, which sometimes proves to be problematic because some of my friends are, understandably, more fond of the warmth.

Your photographic series are visual narratives. There, a feeling of nostalgia seems to emerge gently, together with a kind of melancholy that accompanies your past memories. Is this done on purpose?
When I first started posting my work online a few years ago, I didn’t have a very well-formed idea of what I wanted to do with my photography. I was just posting photos of whatever I was feeling at the time. As I experimented with different film, I realised that I could capture the moods that I’d like my photos to convey. I know that some seem melancholic, but I wouldn’t say I do this on purpose. It’s just what I’m drawn to and what resonates with me.

Through your pictures, you collect memories from journeys, from walks, from lands, from people, from emotions, in mesmerizing imagery. You reveal beautiful moments in time among sublime landscapes. By photographs you keep all your memories close to you. What role does photography play in your life?
Photography plays a very big role in my life, and I honestly can’t imagine a world without it. I actually always wanted to be a painter (or an astronaut!), but I was much better at photography than at painting. There is something very empowering about being able to express myself in visual form.

Often, peaceful and quiet sensations can be detected from your landscapes. How do you feel when alone, all surrounded by nature?
This is the best feeling, although I like to share it with the people closest to me so I don’t feel too alone.

Your pictures are dream-like visions of journeys, travels and memories. How do you recreate these dreamy landscapes?
I focus on three things: the light, the composition and, most importantly, the colour. Together, these three things set the mood.

Your landscapes scenes seem to be natural portraits taken during travels and journeys near and far. However, they enclose very personal, subjective visions of those. You are able to capture moments of your life, gently revealing all feelings of that precise time. How are you able to do it?
I usually have a vague mental image of what the final photo will look like. It’s half planned, half left to chance.

What is leading you to become a professional photographer?
I don’t think I would be able to support myself financially if I became a professional photographer. My plan is to keep doing it alongside a full-time job in science, which is my other passion.

Your next project.
I’m going to Jordan for a few weeks, and I will be exploring more places there than I’ve ever done before.

Your main flaw and quality.
I’m an incredibly restless person. On the bright side, I’ve always been told that I’m very caring.

Make a wish.
I wish I could hug my childhood cat just one more time. She always shows up in my dreams.

Bearing in mind Kandinsky’s theory about colours, Carola Ducoli creates a new kind of art where music, dance and photography mix. Her shots speak gently to the observer. She experiments with shades, she tells sensorial stories where surfaces, bodies and shapes converse. She’s seeking for movements inside of colours.

I would choose this picture because it speaks about an intimate relationship, because it is a nude portray, because it is a film photograph and because it owns much of what interests me more about photography.

Which is your first photographic memory?
The first memory I have about photography belongs to my father. He has been making photographs of me all along my childhood. I remember that it was one of our favorite game when I was young. I was used to strike a pose among flowers, and dress me up with glasses and hats, pretending to be a fancy character. On holiday we were used to tell photographic tales. As a child, I loved photography because it brought back to me all memories about my family through precious photographic albums we were used to keep in the living room. Meanwhile, on my turn, I was creating the photographic memory of my own story through my father’s shots. That fascinated me.
Could you describe yourself with a book, a song and a movie?
A book: Asylum by Patrick McGrath. A song: Dream brother by Jeff Buckley. A movie: Allegro non troppo by Bruno Bozzetto.
Which of your pictures would you choose to introduce yourself?
I would probably choose a self-portrait from the series “Trovarti in tua assenza”. The shot portrays a friend of mine, Giulia, second subjects next to me in the picture, that covers my eyes with her right hand. She looks at the camera, while hugging me with her left arm. I’m sat near her, on a grey cloth stand surrounded by the dark dim-light of the background. A soft, poorly spread out light surrounds both of us, in so creating wide shadows at our backs. I would choose this picture because it speaks about an intimate relationship, because it is a nude portray, because it is a film photograph and because it owns much of what interests me more about photography.
A famous person you would like to portray.
I would like to portray many people, starting from those I meet every day on the road. To identify just one person, it would be very hard.
A famous picture you would have liked to take.
I find hard to answer this question. Probably, I would have liked to shoot each and every photograph that touched me. However, I would not be able to do that as it would not be mine at the same time.

I woke up with the image of a tiny female body dancing and immersed in blue; it was hard to see because of a wired light, rarefied smoke. I fixed that image in my mind and I started traveling with my imagination about colours and sinuous bodies dancing.

Starting from your project “Vasili Vasil’evic Kandinskij”, you experiment with colours, photography and music. You tell stories of flying shapes, bodies, figures. You paint surfaces. Where does your inspiration come from?
It may seem common and ordinary, but the series “Vasili Vasil’evic Kandinskij” comes from the morning memory of a dream. I don’t know the reason why, but I’ve got the luckiness –unluckiness they may say – to remember my dreams almost every night. That morning, I woke up with the image of a tiny female body dancing and immersed in blue; it was hard to see because of a wired light, rarefied smoke. I fixed that image in my mind and I started traveling with my imagination about colours and sinuous bodies dancing. Few minutes later, Kandiskij’s theory about colours came to my mind. I looked for it, I read it all again and I selected five colours to work on. I investigated both auditory and emotional features of each shade, and together with Noemi, the dancer, we tried to create the specific feature of the body moving depending on the selected colour.
A dancer lightly moves and floats in front of your camera. She rises and jumps, surrounded by colorful dust. Blue, yellow, green, purple and red shadows spread in the air, wreath the dancer in, and recreate subtle vibrations that inspire her dance. You seem to be interest in seeking movement inside colours. Are we closed to your concept?
Definitely. I think you have clearly understood my idea.
Your shots speak gently to the observer; they tell sensorial tales where spaces, bodies and shapes converse. We can perceive musicality and poetry in them. How do you reach this effect?
While searching for movement during the shooting, starting from blue suggestions, then moving to green and yellow shades, a choreography happened by chance. Each shade suggested Noemi how to dance. In a white limbo soaked by colored jellies and flour, inspired by the musicality and feeling suggested by those five colours, it was natural to create a dance where shapes and bodies were connected.
“Vasili Vasil’evic Kandinskij” is made of two shots per shade of colour. The result is the creation of smaller units inside the same big artwork. The two shots exist together; they represent our duality. In each couple, we identify the attraction and deep tension between the two shots, like a force connecting opposites and creating something unique where none of them can stand by its own, nor can it live without its counterpart. What is hidden behind the concept of duality?
I have always liked the concept of duality, the duo, the couple. In “Vasili Vasil’evic Kandinskij” I believe that one spare shot is not enough to tell the inner soul of each colour. On the contrary, we need to show its before and after, the alter-ego, the action and the consequence of it; it means to tell a short fraction of movement, two instants of the dance, faraway one to the other; it means to tell about the opposing, complementary duality of every colour.

I love my photographs. I live them as they were the imaginary tales of my life. Anything I take pictures of, it assures me. My pictures remind me about something of myself, they bring me with them.

While approaching to the use of colours, you bear in mind Kandinskij’s theory of colours and the two possible effects colours can have on the spectator: a “physical effect” and a “psychic effect”. Could you explain us something more about it?
Following Kandiskij’s theory about colours, we know that they may have two effects on the observer. Firstly, the physical effect: more superficial and based on temporary feelings, those coming from the retina collecting information about one colour instead of another one. Secondly, the psychic effect that, on the contrary, refers to the spiritual vibration through which colour gets to the soul, in so generating a feeling. The psychic effect of a colour is determined by its sensible qualities: colour has a smell, a taste, a sound. Red, for instance, reawakes the feeling of pain, anger, or even passion in ourselves. The connection doesn’t come from a link between ideas but it’s due to inner features and to its “inner sound”. Bearing in mind that the sound of colour is a vibration, a wave that reaches our inner chords, Kandiskij describes all colours depending on feelings and emotions and he compares them to musical instruments. The composition of a painting depends on the colour, something that, despite our mind is limitless, shapes into a form. Colours cannot live without their shape. To Kandiskij, if a colour is associated with its favorite shape, all effects and feelings coming from colours and shapes, they will consequently increase. Yellow has a privileged relation with triangle, blue with circle and red with square.
You say you love analogue photography to express your thoughts. Sometime your shots are accompanied by words, short poems, deep reflections, few rows of memories and notes that reveal your intimacy. Which relationship do you build with your shots?
I love my photographs. I live them as they were the imaginary tales of my life. Anything I take pictures of, it assures me. My pictures remind me about something of myself, they bring me with them. It could be a romantic vision, I know, but I believe that every photograph is a little piece of the person taking it.
We know you experiment with different art techniques, spurs and expressions, from photography, to painting, scenic design, sculptures. What do you investigate through your art?
I love to experiment with art. I love to mix different media, to sew, to stick, to colour, to build and to find different shapes in order to express what I’m interested in telling. Due to the fact that I really love to experiment, I do not excel in anything in particular. On the contrary, I can do a bit of everything. I investigate thoughts, feelings, lives, tragedies and joys, both mine and other people ones.
What drives you to become a professional photographer?
The fact of doing something I really like to do.
Your next project.
I wish to find soon the time and psychophysics ability to think about it.
Your main flaw and quality.
Impulsiveness. I’ve got a great energy.
Make a wish.
To get to the end of my life with no regrets; to die in calm and tranquility surrounded with love.

Luca Galavotti is a freelance photographer based in Ferrara. A tireless traveler, he investigates the relationship between places and human beings and especially how these elements impinge on each other in a sort of symbiosis.

Every day people live and interact with the environment that surrounds them. The relationship is very close, sometimes conflictual, most of times precarious, but both affect each other.

Which is your first photographic memory?
The first pictures that I keep in my mind are those taken by my dad: he has been photographing too for a short period of his life, and I remember especially those Arabian desert landscapes and those black and white portraits that he took during his travels with a Nikon F2; the same camera that is still my shots companion.

Could you describe yourself with a book, a song and a movie?
It’s always hard to choose just one title, because I think the choice may depend from the moment and the mood. Considering the actual mood and what I’m doing in this period, I will say: a book: “On the road” by Jack Kerouac; a song: “Postcard from Italy” by Beirut; a movie: “La science des rêves” by Michel Gondry.

Which of your pictures would you choose to introduce yourself?
I would probably choose that one of the sea, taken on a boat somewhere among France and England.

A famous person you would like to portray.
I think all the people, famous or not, have specific inner and outer characteristics that deserve to be portrayed. For this reason, I don’t have a specific person that I would like to portray more than others.

A famous picture you would have liked to take.
Any of Luigi Ghirri’s photos.

In your photography a strong relationship between human and landscape emerges. They seem to interact, to tend one to the other as they were connected. How do you reach this effect? Is this done on purpose?
Every day people live and interact with the environment that surrounds them. The relationship is very close, sometimes conflictual, most of times precarious, but both affect each other. Both concerne tangibles and intangibles things, including the mood. Since often we do no notice this, what I try to do is to make this symbiosis visible, and make people be aware of this.

Staircases, airports corridors, empty chairs in waiting rooms are the main subjects of your series “Nonluoghi”. Here, people meet, people cross; they run, they wait, almost unaware of the surrounding environment, a place characterized by constant transition and temporality, as Marc Augée refers to with, “that anthropological place of transience that do not hold enough significance to be regarded as place”. However, it seems that your “Non-places” are primary to the human presence. In your shoots, it is the environment to be the main subject, whereas the human beings are blurry, almost absent, fleeing. Do you think our interpretation is close to your art? What does attract you about such ambiences?
Yes, your interpretation is right.
What attracts me about these ambiences is that they are also big containers. I think that each non-place is also a container; a container of humans, but also a container of stories. A place where everyone can live their story and leave the sign of their passage. When I portray those places, I leave humans voluntarily in the background, blurry, almost absent; in this way who look at the picture can create a personal story to associate with that place. My intention is to give to those ambiences a soul, stopping for a moment the “constant transition” and the perpetual precariousness, typical of our age.

We know you are a tireless traveler. We can’t blame you, really! Travel means to widen horizons; it opens our minds; travels are kind of revelatory epiphanies sometimes. What does travelling means to you? Could you tell us one of the most meaningful travel you have done, so far?
I believe that the definition of travel is very wide. You can travel physically, by moving from a place to another place, but you can also travel with your mind, from a feeling to another one. No matter the way you look at it, traveling is a source of growth, often inner.
I think that the photographic instrument becomes a necessary tool to capture the important moments of the trip, to tell stories, to sculpt thoughts. The same importance as the pen to the writer. Travel and photography are intertwined, indissolubly linked.

What attracts me about these ambiences is that they are also big containers. I think that each non-place is also a container; a container of humans, but also a container of stories.

Everything in your landscapes is composed and balanced, as in a geometrical system. Where does your inspiration come from while taking pictures?
I like the clean and linear photography, without frills, almost minimalist. This style comes from my passion for lines and for symmetry. We live surrounded by lines, they are everywhere, they give a shape to everything, but often we do not notice them. I like to give them importance. And most of all, I think that especially as far as landscape photography is concerned, keeping a clean style could help to create a kind of balance between the author and the subject portrayed, as each of them would have something to say. Like in a conversation.

Speaking about your series “Homeland”, as well as “On the Road”, most of your pictures are taken outdoor, in the fresh air; they catch flying sparrows, wild fields in flowers or covered by the snow, winter skies and endless horizons colored by seasonal tones. Which is your relationship with nature?
I have to say that my relationship with nature has grown over the years.
Nowadays this connection is very strong and I think I could not live without nature, both on a personal and professional level.

And with your homeland?
I have always had a conflictual relationship with my native land. It’s a flat land, and it can be also very boring. When I started the project homeland, I wanted to represent it better and more beautiful than it is in reality; and I have to say that this project helped me – and it’s helping me still – a lot in making me appreciate what I see around me every day. From a photographic point of view I find it a very stimulating activity; I can assure that trying to take nice photos in this area is not as simple as trying to take them on the Dolomites or on a tropical beach, for example.

“What makes photography a strange invention – with unforeseeable consequences – is that its primary raw materials are light and time”, said John Berger. It comes to our minds while observing your photos. Is this true for you?
Thanks. Definitely yes. Aside the technicalities, lights and time are strongly connected. By the light that leaves its footprint on the photosensitive material, we know something’s “been there” in front of the camera when the shutter button was presses. And for a brief moment, a split of a second, there is harmony between the physical subject and the material on which its representation is formed (film, paper, sensor). But soon after that the connection no longer exists.

I like the clean and linear photography, without frills, almost minimalist. This style comes from my passion for lines and for symmetry. We live surrounded by lines, they are everywhere, they give a shape to everything, but often we do not notice them.

You love analogue photography. Why? Where does your fascination for analogue photography come from?
I think that analog photography is a sort of way of life and thought. In a world that goes so fast, photography included, I like to think in an analog way, slowly. And analog photography helps me to do it at my best; especially for the choices I have to make in advance. For example, by choosing which film speed I have to use in a certain situation, or by choosing to shoot in black and white instead of color. I like to live the feelings behind each shot, and the curiosity to see the result days or months later. And most of all, I like to live those moments in the dark room, where I see my thoughts becoming images.

Your next project.
I still have to decide. But it will be certainly something about landscapes.

Your main flaw and quality.
Uh! I have a lot of flaws. One of them is laziness. As far as qualities are concerned, I could say that when I do something, I try do it at my best.

Make a wish.
Keep doing what makes me happy.

Moved by a strong relationship with his homeland, passion and continued curiosity for it, Richard Gaston illustrates and documents the lands of Scotland where he lives. Through the use of composition, he captures landscapes, the mountain culture within and the peaceful combination of nature and man.

I aim to photograph in varied styles; capturing wide vistas, documentary, portraiture but most importantly my primary style. This is in order to build archive imagery and use these images across various platforms for future projects and commissions.

What is your first photographic memory?
I was obsessed with gadgets that came in micro form so having my young hands on a tiny camera (about the size of a box of matches) was extremely stimulating. Abroad with my parents I would photograph our travels. I can’t promise that these images were of any quality, but more importantly I feel that had some factor into my current passion for photography.

Could you describe yourself with a book and a movie?
Book: “The Living Mountain” by Nan Shepherd.
Documentary: “Bill Cunningham New York”.

Which of your pictures would you choose to introduce yourself?
A day of winter hiking through white out conditions in the Southern Highlands of Scotland. Approaching the summit of Ben Lawers I had little visual knowledge of my surroundings because of the foggy conditions. Within the space of a minute the clouds sparse and light shone through the clouds onto the peak of the neighbouring mountain isolating it from its landscape, a beautifully brief moment I will remember forever and an image I feel accurately represents my approach to photography.

A place you would like to go and portray.
Svalbard, in the Arctic Circle. It compliments my views on photography; peaceful isolation, natural elements, untouched landscape and complimented with an abundance of wildlife. When I visit new locations – in new countries more specifically – I aim to photograph in varied styles; capturing wide vistas, documentary, portraiture but most importantly my primary style. This is in order to build archive imagery and use these images across various platforms for future projects and commissions.

A famous picture you would have liked to take.
Marcin Ryczek’s photograph of ‘A Man Feeding Swans in the Snow.’ Personally, it depicts the fundamental aspects of photography, especially in composition and contrast. Perfectly evaluating the ideology of that once-in-a-lifetime shot. 

Throughout your photography you reveal hidden inspiring places in the wilds and wonderlands of Scotland, your homeland. The wild Scottish countryside, its hidden beaches and secret glens are both the main subject and the background of most of your art. How is your relationship with your land? 
I learnt the majority of my photography skill in the Highlands of Scotland photographing landscapes and the mountain culture within. Through years of exploring the remotest areas of the country I have built a firm respect and knowledge for the land. Understanding the boundary of danger and with the hope of something magical happening in natures elements. With that said, my land continues to surprise me offering unique experiences each time I explore new and familiar locations. To sum up my relationship, I hold a bond of respect, passion and continued curiosity for my homeland.

In your series, you explore the themes of solitude, loneliness and secludedness. How do you feel when you are alone surrounded only by nature?   
To say I feel totally at ease and content would be lying, I do feel a certain wave of fear and panic. Like where am I? What am I doing? I’m aware I will experience these emotions prior to heading out, building anticipation and excitement. The most enjoyable part for me personally is on reflection when I am driving home from a trip. It then all makes sense as to why I put myself in those scenarios. The feeling of perspective (of problems) and importance (of experiencing these situations).

As a person, I tend to be a bit of a loner. I prefer my own company. Doing things by myself. So, my photography style reflects me as a person; calm, peaceful and similar to the aforementioned point, being alone with that sense of isolation.

You say to favourite natural light and colours. Through them you document the natural landscape as it is; pure as it is. How long does it take you to take a picture? Do you do it all of a sudden? Or do you usually prefer to wait for the right natural conditions to shoot?
More of a purist in that sense. My images capture the essence of an expedition in a minute period – time is limited and there is a pressure to push on before sun down. Therefore, I do not have the luxury of time to wait for that glimpse of magic or set up a camera awaiting ideal conditions. It’s all about the singular, magical moment that cannot be replicated.

Your photographs recreate quiet and peaceful natural atmospheres. Here, everything is composed. No men are present. On the contrary, the human presence can be denoted by the human passage in the solitary and sporadic bothies you portray, in so revealing human habits and customs of those faraway places. Is this made on purpose? Why?
As a whole that sums up what I am trying to achieve in photography; the peaceful combination of nature and man. Set in a vast sense of overwhelming beautiful landscape surrounding the micro aspect of our kind, conveying just how insignificant we are on this planet. As a person, I tend to be a bit of a loner. I prefer my own company. Doing things by myself. So, my photography style reflects me as a person; calm, peaceful and similar to the aforementioned point, being alone with that sense of isolation.

You document your land through an analytic firm eye. There’s no aim of celebrating it; just the simple, easy act of observation, standing at the wild nature and waiting for a sign, a movement, an answer. What are you searching for while looking through your lens? 
I aim to capture a sense of solitude through the use of composition. That beam of sunlight isolating a minuet figure or the tip of the mountain top. That one wild animal that has left its pack straying on a lonesome path with a feeling of peace. All of which I think illustrates the feeling of being alone and at ease with that feeling. This doesn’t necessarily convey how I feel at that moment when it is captured. I can feel alone and uneasy at this time due to being out in the extreme wilds.

Staring at your wild natural landscapes, never-ending fields and snow-whitened mountains tops we seem to breathe easier, as after a deep gasp of fresh air and oxygen. How do you reach this effect?
I’d like to think that people feel a sense of escapism. Relating to the image in a way that makes them wish to be there. I wouldn’t want to convey the massive amount of effort that is put in to get the image as it is not at all easy going. But instead I like to channel that short-lived moment that makes the arduous hike all worthwhile into my photograph.

All of which I think illustrates the feeling of being alone and at ease with that feeling. This doesn’t necessarily convey how I feel at that moment when it is captured.

What does travel mean to you? 
Ultimately, travel has developed my career as a photographer. I never could have imagined that from what I spent my time doing at the weekends for enjoyment has progressed into a career. Veering away from my university degree I have somewhat disregarded my years in education and pursued what I truly love to do, travel and photography.

While taking pictures, you transform into a careful reporter of wild lands in Highland, Iceland, St Kilda, Whiteland. You tell secret stories of remote places and evocative landscapes. Which place has inspired you the most, so far? 
My home country. It is the place I have learned everything to do with what I am passionate about. I have been though some exhilarating experiences and some life-threatening situations. There is still so much I’ve yet to visit accomplish in the Highlands of Scotland.

Your next project. 
I’m in the midst of a travel guide to Scotland’s wildest parts, titled Wild Guide Scotland. A travel compendium, split into various chapters depending on their geographical locations each recommending the best places to wild camp, hike, wild swim, for viewpoints etc. We’re currently writing up the final pieces and have just returned from out last trip. We have visited almost every corner of the country, including every island. Every image in the book is our own as well as every word. Due to be released in May 2017.

Your main flaw and quality.
Indecisive & passionate.

Make a wish.
To photograph Polar Bears in the Arctic.

Never miss an update from Phinest!

Never miss an update from Phinest

Join our exclusive community

We care about your privacy and we hate spam as much as you do.

Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now

×