“Bearing in mind Kandinsky’s theory about colours, Carola Ducoli creates a new kind of art where music, dance and photography mix. Her shots speak gently to the observer. She experiments with shades, she tells sensorial stories where surfaces, bodies and shapes converse. She’s seeking for movements inside of colours. I would choose this picture because […]”

Getting closer to Carola Ducoli

Bearing in mind Kandinsky’s theory about colours, Carola Ducoli creates a new kind of art where music, dance and photography mix. Her shots speak gently to the observer. She experiments with shades, she tells sensorial stories where surfaces, bodies and shapes converse. She’s seeking for movements inside of colours.

I would choose this picture because it speaks about an intimate relationship, because it is a nude portray, because it is a film photograph and because it owns much of what interests me more about photography.

Which is your first photographic memory?
The first memory I have about photography belongs to my father. He has been making photographs of me all along my childhood. I remember that it was one of our favorite game when I was young. I was used to strike a pose among flowers, and dress me up with glasses and hats, pretending to be a fancy character. On holiday we were used to tell photographic tales. As a child, I loved photography because it brought back to me all memories about my family through precious photographic albums we were used to keep in the living room. Meanwhile, on my turn, I was creating the photographic memory of my own story through my father’s shots. That fascinated me.
Could you describe yourself with a book, a song and a movie?
A book: Asylum by Patrick McGrath. A song: Dream brother by Jeff Buckley. A movie: Allegro non troppo by Bruno Bozzetto.
Which of your pictures would you choose to introduce yourself?
I would probably choose a self-portrait from the series “Trovarti in tua assenza”. The shot portrays a friend of mine, Giulia, second subjects next to me in the picture, that covers my eyes with her right hand. She looks at the camera, while hugging me with her left arm. I’m sat near her, on a grey cloth stand surrounded by the dark dim-light of the background. A soft, poorly spread out light surrounds both of us, in so creating wide shadows at our backs. I would choose this picture because it speaks about an intimate relationship, because it is a nude portray, because it is a film photograph and because it owns much of what interests me more about photography.
A famous person you would like to portray.
I would like to portray many people, starting from those I meet every day on the road. To identify just one person, it would be very hard.
A famous picture you would have liked to take.
I find hard to answer this question. Probably, I would have liked to shoot each and every photograph that touched me. However, I would not be able to do that as it would not be mine at the same time.

I woke up with the image of a tiny female body dancing and immersed in blue; it was hard to see because of a wired light, rarefied smoke. I fixed that image in my mind and I started traveling with my imagination about colours and sinuous bodies dancing.

Starting from your project “Vasili Vasil’evic Kandinskij”, you experiment with colours, photography and music. You tell stories of flying shapes, bodies, figures. You paint surfaces. Where does your inspiration come from?
It may seem common and ordinary, but the series “Vasili Vasil’evic Kandinskij” comes from the morning memory of a dream. I don’t know the reason why, but I’ve got the luckiness –unluckiness they may say – to remember my dreams almost every night. That morning, I woke up with the image of a tiny female body dancing and immersed in blue; it was hard to see because of a wired light, rarefied smoke. I fixed that image in my mind and I started traveling with my imagination about colours and sinuous bodies dancing. Few minutes later, Kandiskij’s theory about colours came to my mind. I looked for it, I read it all again and I selected five colours to work on. I investigated both auditory and emotional features of each shade, and together with Noemi, the dancer, we tried to create the specific feature of the body moving depending on the selected colour.
A dancer lightly moves and floats in front of your camera. She rises and jumps, surrounded by colorful dust. Blue, yellow, green, purple and red shadows spread in the air, wreath the dancer in, and recreate subtle vibrations that inspire her dance. You seem to be interest in seeking movement inside colours. Are we closed to your concept?
Definitely. I think you have clearly understood my idea.
Your shots speak gently to the observer; they tell sensorial tales where spaces, bodies and shapes converse. We can perceive musicality and poetry in them. How do you reach this effect?
While searching for movement during the shooting, starting from blue suggestions, then moving to green and yellow shades, a choreography happened by chance. Each shade suggested Noemi how to dance. In a white limbo soaked by colored jellies and flour, inspired by the musicality and feeling suggested by those five colours, it was natural to create a dance where shapes and bodies were connected.
“Vasili Vasil’evic Kandinskij” is made of two shots per shade of colour. The result is the creation of smaller units inside the same big artwork. The two shots exist together; they represent our duality. In each couple, we identify the attraction and deep tension between the two shots, like a force connecting opposites and creating something unique where none of them can stand by its own, nor can it live without its counterpart. What is hidden behind the concept of duality?
I have always liked the concept of duality, the duo, the couple. In “Vasili Vasil’evic Kandinskij” I believe that one spare shot is not enough to tell the inner soul of each colour. On the contrary, we need to show its before and after, the alter-ego, the action and the consequence of it; it means to tell a short fraction of movement, two instants of the dance, faraway one to the other; it means to tell about the opposing, complementary duality of every colour.

I love my photographs. I live them as they were the imaginary tales of my life. Anything I take pictures of, it assures me. My pictures remind me about something of myself, they bring me with them.

While approaching to the use of colours, you bear in mind Kandinskij’s theory of colours and the two possible effects colours can have on the spectator: a “physical effect” and a “psychic effect”. Could you explain us something more about it?
Following Kandiskij’s theory about colours, we know that they may have two effects on the observer. Firstly, the physical effect: more superficial and based on temporary feelings, those coming from the retina collecting information about one colour instead of another one. Secondly, the psychic effect that, on the contrary, refers to the spiritual vibration through which colour gets to the soul, in so generating a feeling. The psychic effect of a colour is determined by its sensible qualities: colour has a smell, a taste, a sound. Red, for instance, reawakes the feeling of pain, anger, or even passion in ourselves. The connection doesn’t come from a link between ideas but it’s due to inner features and to its “inner sound”. Bearing in mind that the sound of colour is a vibration, a wave that reaches our inner chords, Kandiskij describes all colours depending on feelings and emotions and he compares them to musical instruments. The composition of a painting depends on the colour, something that, despite our mind is limitless, shapes into a form. Colours cannot live without their shape. To Kandiskij, if a colour is associated with its favorite shape, all effects and feelings coming from colours and shapes, they will consequently increase. Yellow has a privileged relation with triangle, blue with circle and red with square.
You say you love analogue photography to express your thoughts. Sometime your shots are accompanied by words, short poems, deep reflections, few rows of memories and notes that reveal your intimacy. Which relationship do you build with your shots?
I love my photographs. I live them as they were the imaginary tales of my life. Anything I take pictures of, it assures me. My pictures remind me about something of myself, they bring me with them. It could be a romantic vision, I know, but I believe that every photograph is a little piece of the person taking it.
We know you experiment with different art techniques, spurs and expressions, from photography, to painting, scenic design, sculptures. What do you investigate through your art?
I love to experiment with art. I love to mix different media, to sew, to stick, to colour, to build and to find different shapes in order to express what I’m interested in telling. Due to the fact that I really love to experiment, I do not excel in anything in particular. On the contrary, I can do a bit of everything. I investigate thoughts, feelings, lives, tragedies and joys, both mine and other people ones.
What drives you to become a professional photographer?
The fact of doing something I really like to do.
Your next project.
I wish to find soon the time and psychophysics ability to think about it.
Your main flaw and quality.
Impulsiveness. I’ve got a great energy.
Make a wish.
To get to the end of my life with no regrets; to die in calm and tranquility surrounded with love.

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